no.

kelsey rakes jaggers

samsupernal:

NO BUT IMAGINE ALL THE STORIES DEATH COULD TELL 

IMAGINE SOMEONE MEETING DEATH AT LAST AND JUST BEING QUIET AND SAYING “BEFORE I GO, CAN I ASK YOU A QUESTION?” 

AND DEATH IS ALL ANNOYED BECAUSE HE’S INFINITY AND DARKNESS AND FULL OF SORROWS AND HE’S EXPECTING THE REGULAR “WHAT COMES AFTER” BUT THE QUESTION STUNS HIM

"WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER?" 

(via children-ofthe-wildones)

In the middle of drinks, maybe the fifth or the sixth, I am completely alone at a table of friends. I feel nothing for them, I feel nothing for anyone.

—Conor Oberst (via boonevalenta)

(via xfashionbugx)

jaclcfrost:

what you said was very sweet and means a lot to me but i am incapable of properly responding in any way besides “thank you so much aaaah” because i do not know how to accurately express the exact level of my gratitude to where you completely understand how much what you said meant to me without me getting even more emotional and looking like a fucking nerd: an autobiography

(via gameofblogging)

escapekit:

The Last Billboard

A 36-foot-long billboard located at the corner of Highland and Baum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Every month, a different individual is invited to take over the billboard to broadcast personalized messages, which are spelt out using wooden letters that are changed by hand. 

you can follow it’s tumblr here. 

(via stolenlighters)

novalidole:

eliza bennett embroiders a self-inflicted sculpture into her flesh 

using her own skin as a canvas, british artist eliza bennett has realized a self-inflicted sculpture, woven into the palm of her hand. considering the flesh as a base material, bennett carefully stitches patterns and lines into the epidermis of her body using colored thread; ‘a woman’s work is never done’ results as an incredibly worn-looking hand, overworked and fatigued. by using intricate embroidery techniques — traditionally used to symbolize femininity — and applying it to a context of its opposite, bennett challenges the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy‘through a personally charged perception, I explore a range of issues relating to the formlessness of both individual and social reality’, the artist says of her ephemeral sculpture’s significance. the administered piece on the surface of her skin aims to chronicle the effects of labor intensive work, while drawing attention to low paid jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all of which are traditionally considered to be gender specific towards women.

(via stolenlighters)